Monday, December 31, 2012

Questioning the Questions

Photo courtesy of Apple Creek Whitetails

If you want a successful hunt, start with understanding. Understanding what's present and what's not present. Most of all, understanding how it all fits together and the opportunities that exist in both.

The best solutions to hunting problems don't come from finding good answers to the questions that are presented.

They come from discovering new questions.

Good Luck and Good Hunting,

Jim Collyer
http://jimcollyer.com/

Friday, December 28, 2012

It’s the Off-Season

Even though the Whitetail season continues throughout much of the South, for most of us the season is over and we are in the off-season. The long wait for next season has begun, leaving many of us wondering what to do until deer season begins next fall. An excellent way to fight winter doldrums is to hunt coyotes. It’s a great way to hone our hunting skills.


Coyotes are as wary and cagy as any whitetail. I particularly liked to hunt coyotes in the snow. They leave tracks and can be patterned. Successfully hunting coyotes requires the same skills as successfully hunting whitetails. The best way I know to practice whitetail hunting is to hunt coyotes.

* Note: Coyotes spend the better part of daylight hours in cover, just like whitetails. I’ve killed more coyotes in the timber than I ever have in fields.

As a bonus, you can discover a lot of whitetail hunting spots while hunting coyotes.

Good Luck and Good Hunting,
Jim
http://jimcollyer.com/

Thursday, December 20, 2012

Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year

                                                Photo courtesy of Apple Creek Whitetails

MERRY CHRISTMAS
AND
A HAPPY NEW YEAR

Monday, December 17, 2012

Confusing Lucky with Good

Photo courtesy of Apple Creek Whitetails
 
 
This is why trophy hunting successes fade. This is why amateur hunters so often fail. This is why one-off hunting analogy stories make no sense. Success at the beginning blinds us to the opportunity to get really good instead of merely coasting.

The only thing more sad than the self-limiting arrogance of the confusion between lucky and good is the pathos of the converse: confusing ungood with unlucky.

Most hunters don't get lucky at first. Or second. Or even third. It's so easy to conclude that if you're not lucky, you're not good. So persistence becomes an essential element of good, because without persistence, you never get a chance to get lucky.

True luck requires persistence.

Get the Book

Good Luck and Good Hunting,

Jim

Thursday, December 13, 2012

Four Questions Worth Answering

Photo courtesy of Apple Creek Whitetails
 
 
Where is your next buck? (Specifically, not conceptually. Describe his bedding area, his feeding area, and his travel routes.)

Why is the buck here? (What is it about this situation that attracted the buck in the first place?)

How do you encounter him in a way that is undetected?

What changes are you going to make to adapt to his routine?

Start with this before you spend time on tactics, technology or strategies.

Get the Book Here

Good Luck and Good Hunting,

Jim

Tuesday, December 11, 2012

The Perfect Stocking Stuffer


‘Tis the Season to be Jolly


Can you imagine the big smile when your hunter finds Santa has left them a copy if the book Buck Naked in their stocking?

Buck Naked; The Straight Dope on Trophy Whitetails contains the latest cutting-edge advice, tactics, and strategies on Whitetail hunting.

Share this with your Santa and maybe you’ll find a copy of Buck Naked in your stocking instead of the usual coal and sticks.

Happy Holidays,
Jim
Get your stocking stuffer now

Monday, December 10, 2012

Hunting Sheds

Among the whitetail hunter’s fraternity the spring search for shed antlers has become almost as competitive and widespread as hunting itself. Over the years I have found hundreds of shed antlers, the vast majority of which I didn’t even bother to pick up. A handful were of Boone & Crockett quality. What, if anything, can finding sheds do to help a hunter in his efforts to be more successful the following fall? The answer is plenty, if you know what to look for.


There are three things that affect the dropping of antlers: diet, stress, and hormonal fluctuations. The loss of hormones is the strongest determining factor. The largest bucks never seem to hold on to their headgear very long after the rut. Bucks fatigued from excessive fighting and breeding during the rut will be the first to lose their antlers.

Once I found a pair of fresh sheds on December 2 that clearly came from a “Booner.” The very next day I found an even bigger shed. Although finding sheds so early is unusual, it is even more uncommon the find a truly big buck carrying his antlers into January. I have spent a lot of year’s bow hunting in December and find it’s a race every year to get a big buck before he sheds. By the middle of December, panic starts to set in as we become aware that "Buckzilla" could become a "baldy" by morning.

Just like in deer hunting, the sheds from smaller bucks are much more common than those from larger bucks. Smaller bucks can keep their antlers well into February and March. For this reason small sheds offer us little valuable information.

The biggest bucks begin to lose their antlers shortly after the rut. I like to start looking for sheds as soon after the end of the hunting season as possible. December’s moist earth or fresh snow makes it a great time to look for tracks and to learn more about deer patterns in your area. Snow reveals the truths about the how’s and why’s of deer movement in any area.

Most importantly, if you find a monster shed, you’ll know exactly where that buck was during the rut, and should have a darn good idea where to look for him next fall. This is when you start looking for trees to hang a stand in next year. Look for nearby funnels, and brush thickets close to bedding areas. This is the one time of the year that busting a buck out of his bed won’t come back to hurt you. The buck has a whole year to forget about you. Regardless, be careful not to stress the deer anytime during the winter and early spring months.

I have used shed hunting to pattern several bucks over the years. It is often much more effective than preseason scouting, especially if you plan to hunt the rut.

I was looking for sheds and found an exceptionally large antler in a narrow timbered funnel. Towards the end of the season I hung a stand with hopes of catching the buck as he searched for does. About half an hour before the end of shooting hours I saw him coming. There was a large draw between us and I momentarily lost sight of him. I prayed he would come into view before it was too dark to shoot. He passed within twenty yards of the stand. As he quartered away, I let the air out of him.

Good Luck and Good Hunting,
Jim
Buy the Book for X-mas

Sunday, December 9, 2012

Get BUCK NAKED for X-mas

Get BUCK NAKED for X-mas

Looking for that special gift for the outdoorsman in your life? Give them the gift that truly keeps on giving, a copy of the book Buck Naked; The Straight Dope on Trophy Whitetails.


Here’s a gift that will be appreciated this Christmas season and for years to come. Buck Naked is jammed packed with tips, tactics, and strategies that will benefit both the novice and seasoned hunter.

At $15.84, it’s affordable for all of the hunters on your list. It also makes a great stocking stuffer.

Have a great Holiday Season,
Jim
http://www.amazon.com/Buck-Naked-Straight-Trophy-Whitetails/dp/1466498234

http://jimcollyer.com/


Saturday, December 8, 2012

Beware of Zombie Hunters

The walking dead don't just appear weekly on TV but in deer woods everywhere. I see them every hunting season. I’m sitting in a stand and some zombie comes walking through, wind at his back, eyes to the ground, and stinking up the place. It’s just like the zombies on TV (they even dress like them).

This all happens when hunters see the deer as a mirror image of themselves.

The zombie hunter thinks if he just keeps repeating unsuccessful past behaviors long enough and hard enough, success will find him. As a result, he walks around aimlessly and his development time slows and the road to success lengthens.

And what do zombies feed on? Why their own egos of course! Which explains why zombie hunters stumble around hoping the deer will find them.

Don’t be a zombie.

Grab a copy now

Good Luck and Good Hunting,

Jim

Friday, December 7, 2012

Scout Now for Next Seasn's Buck

I am often asked, “when is the best time to scout?”


The answer is “immediately after you harvest your buck.”

The biggest advantage is you will be scouting exactly where the deer will be come hunting season next fall. I like to do my scouting a couple of days after a fresh snowfall. This allows the deer enough movement to show travel routes, feeding preferences, and bedding sites. I’m not worried about spooking deer now as there’s nearly 12 months before I’ll be hunting them again. That’s ample time to let the herd settled now.

If you hunt in areas that don’t receive much if any snowfall, wait a couple days after a hard rain to do your scouting. The old tracks will either be washed away are rounded out by the rain. Look for tracks with crisp edges. Also, keep track of any rubbed trees are scrapes you my find.

If an area has the cover, security, and feed to hold large deer one year, the odds are that it will hold that deer or another large deer the next season.

Missing sign all together or misreading sign is one of the most common mistakes made in hunting. Most hunters tend to block out apparent sign and focus only on the sign that they are comfortable with. They use scouting to support some preconceived conclusion of what the outcome should be instead of letting the sign speak for itself. People tend not to believe what they see, but see what they believe.

Buy the Book Now
If you scout immediately after your hunting season, you’ll be well on your way to harvesting another great buck next fall.

Good Luck and Good Hunting,
Jim
http://jimcollyer.com/

Thursday, December 6, 2012

Get Buck Naked for X-mas


Get BUCK NAKED for X-mas

Looking for that special gift for the outdoorsman in your life? Give them the gift that truly keeps on giving, a copy of the book Buck Naked; The Straight Dope on Trophy Whitetails.


Here’s a gift that will be appreciated this Christmas season and for years to come. Buck Naked is jammed packed with tips, tactics, and strategies that will benefit both the novice and seasoned hunter.

At $14.95, it’s affordable for all of the hunters on your list. It also makes a great stocking stuffer.

Have a great Holiday Season,
Jim

Get Buxk Naked for X-mas

http://jimcollyer.com/






Wednesday, December 5, 2012

‘Tis the Season


'Tis the season of giving.


Looking for something special for the hunters on your list? Buck Naked; The Straight Dope on Trophy Whitetails is the perfect gift for every outdoors person. The book is literally jam with valuable tips, tactics, and strategies for all hunters regardless of their experience level.

Put a big smile on the face of that special hunter when he opens your package and finds a copy of Buck Naked.

The tips and tactics found in Buck Naked will be appreciated not only this Christmas season but for years to come. Buck Naked is truly a gift that keeps on giving. It’s affordable to buy and easy to ship.

Put a smile on their faces come Christmas morning, get them a copy of the book Buck Naked this holiday season.

Seasons Greetings,
Jim
Get Buck Naked for X-mas

Tuesday, December 4, 2012

Young Hunters and Trophy Deer

I recently received a couple of letters from readers asking my advice as to whether young hunters should be encouraged to hold out for a trophy deer or be allowed to harvest a lesser quality animal.


Hunting is SERIOUS BUSINESS, DEADLY SERIOUS.

When you put a weapon capable of killing a big game animal in the hands of a child, he or she is no longer a child. They hold the power of life and death in their hands. This is serious business.
My recommendation is to always allow the young hunter their choice on which animal to harvest. Too often, parents attempt to relive their childhood through their children. We all want our children to achieve a level of higher success that we have. The tendency is to make the hunt easy for the child. This is always a mistake since humans thrive on a challenge.

Even a 10-year-old with a gun or bow in their hands must be capable of making the proper decisions on how to use that weapon. Every hunter regardless of age must make their own decisions in the field, including which deer to harvest.

I always ask young hunters what they expect to harvest. I informed them of their responsibilities, the difficulties and challenges they will face, and asked them if they are willing to do the work necessary.

After that, it’s up to them.

Good Luck and Good Hunting,
Jim

Monday, December 3, 2012

Combating Swirling Winds

Photo courtesy of Apple Creek Whitetails

One of the questions I get asked most often is, “ How do you hunt in swirling winds?”


Swirling winds can occur anywhere in North America. However, they seem to occur most often while I’m hunting whitetail deer. Swirling winds can be a real nightmare. Often the only thing we succeed at is blowing are scent all over the hunting area and lowering our chances of seeing deer let alone harvesting one. While swirling winds are far from the ideal hunting situation there are a couple of things you can do to improve your chances.

First off, we should place our stand high on a ridge. This will help prevent both thermals and circling winds from pushing our scent throughout the area.

Secondly, we should place our stand high in the tree. I recommend a minimum of 18 to 20 feet. This dramatically improves our chances of keeping our odors above the deer’s noses.

If I’m still hunting or stalking, I’ll move into the direction of the prevailing wind regardless of the wind swirling. Often the prevailing wind will keep the swirling winds from spreading our scent to far in front of us. But you’ll be much farther ahead if you hunt out of a high stand on a high ridge during swirling winds then any other hunting method.

I can promise you this, you have a better chance of killing a deer hunting in swirling winds than you do sitting in your living room watching football.

Good Luck and Good Hunting,
Jim
The Book
http://jimcollyer.com/

Saturday, December 1, 2012

Anxious vs. Eager

Photo courtesy of Apple Creek Whitetails
 
Most people miss use the word anxious when they really mean eager. Anxious comes from the root word anxiety.
We define anxious as experiencing failure in advance. Eager, its antonym, indicates anticipation.
When you hunt with anticipation, you will highlight the highs. You'll double down on the things that will delight and push yourself even harder to apply the tactics and strategies which bring success. If this is going to work, might as well build something that's going to be truly worth building.
If you hunt with anxiety, on the other hand, you'll be covering the possible lost bets, you'll be insuring against disaster and most of all, building deniability into all of your actions. When you hunt under the cloud of anxiety, the best strategy is to play it safe, because if (when!) it fails, you'll be blameless.
Not only is it more fun to hunt with anticipation, it's often a self-fulfilling point of view.

The Book
Good Luck and Good Hunting,
Jim
http://jimcollyer.com/

Thursday, November 29, 2012

FREE KNIFE TODAY ONLY

 
Today is the day
 
Sassy Does in conjunction with author Jim Collyer will be giving away 100 “Limited Edition” knives on November 29, 2012!
 
 Sassy Does ladies hunting apparel; It's time to start a revolution in the woods... it's time to Get Sassy.
 
Purchase a copy of the book, Buck Naked, from Amazon on November 29th and receive a FREE knife.
 
As part of our book launch promotion we are giving away 100 FREE “Limited Edition” lockback pocket knives. The knife is engraved with the Buck Naked logo. It has a beautiful Maple Burl Wood handle and a 2-1/4" 440C stainless steel blade. That’s an $18.95 value and it’s yours FREE with the purchase a copy of the book BUCK NAKED : The Straight Dope on Trophy Whitetails.
There’s only one catch. The book must be purchased through Amazon.com and must be purchased on Nov.29, 2012. Only the first 100 books sold will receive the FREE knife.
To receive your FREE knife simply purchase a copy of Buck Naked from Amazon.com on Nov. 29th.
Email a copy of your receipt along with your mailing address to jim@jimcollyer.com  and we’ll ship you a knife for free. We’ll even pay the postage.
 
 
Remember: The book must be purchased TODAY to receive this special offer.
Bonus Offer
 
Win an artist proof on canvas of Michael Sieve’s “Busted Bachelors” print. Simply purchase a book or enter the contest on my site for a chance to win this 24" x 36" artist proof canvas edition. NO purchase necessary. The print is beautifully framed and has a retail value of $895.00.
 
If you are already subscribed to Jim Collyer’s blog, you are already entered in the contest. If you purchase a book on Nov. 29th your name will be entered in the drawing an additional time for each book purchased.
Let’s make this the most successful hunting book launch ever.
Please go to Facebook and like these pages:
 
Thank you for your support and good luck,
Jim and the Sassy Does Team
 

Today Only

Purchase a copy of the book, Buck Naked, from Amazon today, November 29th and receive a FREE knife.

As part of our book launch promotion we are giving away 100 FREE "Limited Edition" lockback pocket knives. The knife is engraved with the Buck Naked logo. It has a beautiful Maple Burl Wood handle and a 2-1/4" 440C stainless steel blade. That’s an $18.95 value and it’s yours FREE with the purchase a copy of the book BUCK NAKED : The Straight Dope on Trophy Whitetails.

There’s only one catch. The book must be purchased through Amazon.com and must be purchased on Nov.29, 2012. Only the first 100 books sold will receive the FREE knife.

To receive your FREE knife simply purchase a copy of Buck Naked from Amazon.com on Nov. 29th.

Email a copy of your receipt along with your mailing address to jim@jimcollyer.com and we’ll ship you a knife for free. We’ll even pay the postage.

Get your FREE knife now

Good Luck, Jim

Wednesday, November 28, 2012

GET A FREE KNIFE TOMORROW

PLEASE SHARE THIS E-MAIL WITH ALL OF YOUR FRIENDS
 
GET A FREE KNIFE TOMORROW
 
Sassy Does in conjunction with author Jim Collyer will be giving away 100 "Limited Edition" knives tomorrow, November 29, 2012!

Sassy Does ladies hunting apparel; It's time to start a revolution in the woods... it's time to Get Sassy.

http://www.sassydoes.com/



Purchase a copy of the book Buck Naked from Amazon tomorrow, November 29, 2012 and receive a FREE knife.

Please forward this e-mail to all of your hunting friends.

Tomorrow, November 29th, we are giving away 100 FREE "Limited Edition" lockback pocket knives. The knife is engraved with the Buck Naked logo. It has a beautiful Maple Burl Wood handle and a 2-1/4" 440C stainless steel blade. That’s an $18.95 value and it’s yours FREE with the purchase a copy of the book BUCK NAKED : The Straight Dope on Trophy Whitetails.

There’s only one catch. The book must be purchased through Amazon.com and must be purchased on Nov.29, 2012. Only the first 100 books sold will receive the FREE knife.

To receive your FREE knife simply purchase a copy of Buck Naked from Amazon.com on Nov. 29th.

Email a copy of your receipt along with your mailing address to jim@jimcollyer.com and we’ll ship you a knife for free.

Here's the link, but wait until tomorrow to buy
Bonus Offer
 

Win an artist proof on canvas of Michael Sieve’s "Busted Bachelors" print. Simply purchase a book or enter the contest on my site for a chance to win this 24" x 36" artist proof canvas edition. NO purchase necessary. The print is beautifully framed and has a retail value of $895.00.

Enter contest here

If you are already subscribed to my blog, you are already entered in the contest. If you purchase a book on Nov. 29th your name will be entered in the drawing an additional time for each book purchased.

Let’s make this the most successful hunting book launch ever.

Please go to facebook and like these pages:
Sassy Does on Facebook

Whitetail Maestro on Facebook

 
Thank you for your support and good luck,

Jim and the Sassy does Team
http://jimcollyer.com/

Tuesday, November 27, 2012

Two Days Until the Launch

On November 29th, we are giving away 100 FREE "Limited Edition" lockback pocket knives. The knife is engraved with the Buck Naked logo. It has a beautiful Maple Burl Wood handle and a 2-1/4" 440C stainless steel blade. That’s an $18.95 value and it’s yours FREE with the purchase a copy of the book BUCK NAKED : The Straight Dope on Trophy Whitetails.

There’s only one catch. The book must be purchased through Amazon.com and must be purchased on Nov.29, 2012. Only the first 100 books sold will receive the FREE knife.

To receive your FREE knife simply purchase a copy of Buck Naked from Amazon.com on Nov. 29th.

Email a copy of your receipt from Nov. 29, 2012 along with your mailing address to jim@jimcollyer.com and we’ll ship you a knife for free.
 
BUCK NAKED: The Straight Dope on Trophy Whitetails – reveals the truths and shatters the myths about trophy hunting.
BUCK NAKED explains what trophy hunting is, why you fall short of your expectations, and how you can avoid the mental lapses that prevent you from consistently harvesting HUGE BUCKS. The secrets to consistent success will surprise, even astonish you. If you have ever found yourself coming home empty handed, you will appreciate the consistent success you can attain when you begin hunting from a position of strength and knowledge. If your goal is to harvest trophy class Bucks on a regular basis, read this book. You will learn the secrets and the habits that will allow you to harvest the BUCK OF A LIFETIME this year and every year.
Use this Link on Thursday- Only Thursday

Tomorrow, I'll be announcing a NEW CONTEST.
Good Luck and Good Hunting,
Jim
http://jimcollyer.com/

Monday, November 26, 2012

A Special Announcement

Support the Book Launch and Receive a FREE Knife
This Thursday, November 29, 2012 we will be launching the NEW BUCK NAKED book. The first 100 books sold on Amazon will receive a FREE folding knife with the Buck Naked logo engraved on the handle.

 
This is an advanced notice to my blog readers. Only those purchasing a book on
November 29th will be eligible to receive the FREE knife.
You’ll have to wait until Thursday to buy your book if you want to receive a FREE knife.

Please forward this e-mail to all of your hunting friends. OR at least those friends you want to give the opportunity to receive a FREE knife.

There’s only one catch. The book must be purchased through Amazon.com and must be purchased on Nov.29, 2012. Only the first 100 books sold will receive the FREE knife.

To receive your FREE knife simply purchase a copy of Buck Naked from Amazon.com on Nov. 29th.

Email a copy of your receipt along with your mailing address to jim@jimcollyer.com and we’ll ship you a knife for free.

Here's the link, but wait until Thursday

The book has a complete new look. Apple Creek Whitetail Ranch provided the new cover image as well as the interior deer images. Apple Creek’s John Eriksson does an amazing job photographing whitetails.

If you haven’t checked out their website, do it now. You won’t believe the videos and pictures.

http://www.applecreekranch.com/

Good Luck and Good Hunting,
Jim

http://jimcollyer.com/

Sunday, November 25, 2012

Cycle worse, cycle better

Photo courtesy Apple Creek Whitetails
 
Most things that go wrong, go wrong slowly. The downward spiral is all too familiar. A hunting problem leads to a buck lost.
The answer isn't to look for the swift and certain solution to the long-term problem. The solution is to replace the down cycle with the up cycle.
The (too common, obvious, simple) plan is to hunt with a cycle that caused the problem instead developing better strategies and tactics. The simple plan puts the blame on the outside world to stop contributing factors which lead to a negative output. If we just keep using unproductive hunting tactics long enough things will get better. This takes control and fate out of our hands and just isn’t going to work very well.
The more difficult but more effective alternative is to become aware of the down cycle. Once you find it, understand what triggers it and then learn to use that trigger to initiate a different cycle.
"This is my down cycle. How can I replace it with a different one? Who can help me? What do I need to learn? How do I change my habits and my instincts?"
This is incredibly difficult. But identifying the down cycle and investing in replacing it with the up cycle is the one and only best strategy. The alternative, which is to rationalize and defend the cycle as a law of nature or permanent habit, is tragic.

Change your cycle now

Good Luck and Good Hunting,
Jim

Friday, November 23, 2012

Fear of Failure


Apple Creek Whitetails Photo
 
I hate the word ‘failure’, just as much as I hate the words guilty, fault or blame in deer hunting. I was taught that if you don’t make mistakes, you don’t make anything.

And I do 'make' a lot of mistakes... So, if you make a mistake don’t go all "Oh, I’m so sorry" on me. I’d rather hear you say what you’ve learned.

Personally, I ‘fail’ a lot of the time. But I’m sure I’ve given it the best I can. I don’t blame myself, nor someone else, and I move on. Return to start. Try again and remember the lesson learned. Or as Thomas Edison put it more eloquently: "Many of life's failures are men who did not realize how close they were to success when they gave up."

Did you 'learn' from your mistakes? I sure did. It only took me a couple of dozen lost bucks to boost my learning curve. But, you don't have to miss a couple of dozen bucks to boost your learning curve. Grab acopy of BUCK NAKED today.

Grab a Copy Here

Good Luck and Good Hunting,

Jim

Wednesday, November 21, 2012

Black Friday is Ridiculous


One minute after Thanksgiving and the official Christmas shopping season begins. There are actually people who get up at midnight and rush to the stores to find that special gift for that special person. Why?

Looking for that special gift for the outdoorsman in your life? Give them the gift that truly keeps on giving, a copy of the book Buck Naked; The Straight Dope on Trophy Whitetails.

Here’s a gift that will be appreciated this Christmas season and for years to come. Buck Naked is jammed packed with tips, tactics, and strategies that will benefit both the novice and seasoned hunter.

At $14.95, it’s affordable for all of the hunters on your list. It also makes a great stocking stuffer.

Have a great Holiday Season,
Jim
Get Buck-Naked forChristmas

Tuesday, November 20, 2012

Buck Naked Coffee Cups and More

Now’s your chance to get the coveted "I Love Buck Naked" coffee cup.

A premium-sized ceramic coffee mug. With its large easy-to-grip handle, steady base, and hefty 15 oz. capacity, this mug allows for comfortable sipping and slosh-free use, at home or at the office. Dishwasher & microwave safe, it's easy to clean and for reheating.
  • High-Fired Ceramic
  • Microwave & dishwasher safe
  • Holds 15 oz.
  • Dimensions: 4.5" tall, 3.25" diameter
Order Your Cup Here
More Items
Remember, Christmas is around the corner and these cups make a wonderful, memorable, and affordable gift.
Good Luck and Good Hunting,
Jim



Sunday, November 18, 2012

The Earth is Flat


I don't know whether to laugh or cry.

I'm hearing some pretty strange things said about deer and deer hunting these days. It would be really funny, except - it's keeping a lot of transformational hunters from succeeding.

These "Whitetail Myths" are part of a HUGE misunderstanding about deer that many of today’s experts are perpetuating on hard working hunters. Right up there with:
The earth is flat.
Women shouldn't have the vote.

Remember those? They weren't true either, but much of society believed them for centuries.

Want to see the "Whitetail Myths" that you've been told (and have believed!) that are keeping you from the consistent success you deserve? They're all in a special book, "Buck Naked: The Straight Dope on Trophy Whitetails"
This book is only about 135 pages long, and it's packed with great information, so check it out now:


Get Your Copy Here

http://jimcollyer.com/

Good Luck and Good Hunting,
Jim

Thursday, November 15, 2012

CRITICAL: You MUST choose each moment wisely...

As I know oh-so-well from 45 years of trophy hunting, every day you're forced to make tough choices about what to spend your time on in order to improve your own personal odds for success.

The key question is simple: "What should I be doing right now?!"

Every day you need to ask this core question.

Every day you need to choose how you spend your time prudently and wisely.

Today, November 15th the rut peaks in most northern states. Do you continue to carry on trying to harvest bucks in the same old way you've been doing year after year... with the same predictable results?

Or do you instead invest a few dollars and a little time to learn how you can finally UNLEASH your latent talents and skills... leverage them in a way that's integral to your hunting success... finally giving yourself the critical tools needed to harvest the buck of your dreams?

It's up to you.

Get your cpoy here!

Good Luck and Good Hunting,
Jim
http://jimcollyer.com/

Wednesday, November 14, 2012

Scouting is Lifeblood

Photo courtesy Apple Creek Whitetails

A brief summary. Scouting is lifeblood. If you are overly reliant on any one location or method for your hunting…. If you have an insufficient or unsteady method for scouting good bucks….if you lack a well-organized, complete system for understanding, implementing, or following up on your scouting…
….you are on very thin ice.
I’ve been at this for about 45 years. About as long as many reading this have been walking the earth. Four and a half decades. I am – today, this moment – well respected and sought out for hunting advice across the nation. My reach has been and is broad and deep. In all these years, I have never once seen a hunter achieve consistent success without proper scouting.

Learn the fast track method for scouting here

Good Luck and Good Hunting,

Jim
http://jimcollyer.com/

Monday, November 12, 2012

Become a more Successful Hunter




The Single Easiest Way to Become a more Successful Hunter

Wouldn't it be amazing if you knew the single easiest way to become a successful trophy hunter?
Find Out Here!

Now you can...I'm finally going to show you the single greatest way for you to become a super successful whitetail hunter.

I've created Buck Naked; The Straight Dope on Trophy Whitetails to teach you the simple and easy-to-learn ways to get everything you want out deer hunting.

Get on the road to success and start harvesting the bucks you've always dreamed of.

Best Regards,

Saturday, November 10, 2012

They Only Come Out at Night

 
"A good deer hunter hunts where the buck is. A great deer hunter hunts where the buck is going to be."
As night begins to fall, the coyotes howl, the owls hoot and the deer begin to move. Have you ever wondered what is really out there in the dark?
Every trophy hunter owes it to himself to go out and do a little late night surveillance and reconnaissance. It’s a whole different world at night. There is an abundance of wildlife out at night. Animals rarely seen during the day come out into the open under the cover of darkness. It will be a real awakening for you. You’ll see things that you never knew existed.
While most animals that are thought of as nocturnal are in fact crepuscular. Crepuscular animals are most active during twilight: both at dawn and dusk. Dogs, cats, rabbits, bears, and deer are considered crepuscular animals. This makes complete sense. Deer feed most heavily a few hours after sunset and again right before dawn and are most commonly seen at those times.
Anyone who seriously scouts bucks goes at dawn and dusk.
Scientists believe that deer are more active at twilight and night to reduce their risk of predation. They are able to protect themselves as well as their offspring better due to this pattern of activity.
Nocturnal and crepuscular animals have highly developed senses. Their sense of hearing, sight and smell are specially adapted, to make the most of night-illumination. Deer have vision that is easily adapted to both night and day illumination. They have large pupils and a large amount of "rods" in their eyes to help them see in the dark. With a white membrane, the tapetum, in the back of their eyes to reflects light back to their retinas, deer are perfectly adapted to a nocturnal lifestyle.

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Generally speaking, deer also benefit from scents that linger in the air longer at night. Since the air is still, it becomes easier for the deer to pick up and track scents, and to find food.
Sounds are more acute at night and deers extra powerful sense of hearing allows it to better determine the distance and direction of a noise.
Years ago I had a small farm at the base of the Selkirk Mountains. I borrowed a tractor from a neighbor and planted the pastures in deer feed. Every evening we would have a dozen or more does and a couple of smaller bucks come into the pastures to feed. After several months I thought I knew every deer on the property.
On day, just for giggles, I moved the spot light showing on our driveway and pointed it out into the pasture. A couple of hours after dark I happened to look out at the pasture. The big bucks were just starting to come in. And when I say big bucks, I mean big bucks. In total 14 bucks came in that night, of which, 9 were in the 130" to 150" class. I had only seen one of these bucks before and I had lived at that farm for 5 years.
While deer may be crepuscular, I can tell you big bucks are nearly totally nocturnal. It’s true, they only come out at night.
I’ve spent countless nights driving around with a spot light and I’ve seen literally hundreds of bucks I wouldn’t have ever seen otherwise. They are every where. From inside the city limits to remote alfalfa fields.
Nowadays most hunters rely on trail cameras to do their scouting for them. One drawback to these cameras is that the deer has to move within 10 to 15 yards of the front of the camera in order to get it’s picture taken. This leaves a lot of uncovered area. The other drawback is the vast majority of bucks captured on film are at night. This does us little good. We need to know where the deer is at during the day.
The question has always been: "Does spot lighting bucks really improve you odds at successfully harvesting a big buck? "
Sadly, the answer is: "No." But it's a lot of fun.
95% of these bucks I saw at night were unhuntable. Either I couldn’t get permission from the land owner or more likely the wind thermals didn’t allow a set-up. The biggest benefit from spot lighting is the confidence gained in knowing a monster is in the area. It’s a lot easier to stay in the field all day when you know Mr. Big is close.
A great hunter hunts where the bucks are going to be. Knowing where the buck was the night before gives us some indication as to where he will be come day light. He should be within a mile. That’s a big area. But at least it’s a starting point.
Regardless, just seeing those bucks is reward enough.

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Good Luck and Good Hunting,
Jim
http://jimcollyer.com/

Thursday, November 8, 2012

The Rut

                                                Photo courtsey of Apple Creek Whitetails
Predicting the rut is one of the hottest topics in whitetail hunting. You don’t need a crystal ball, tea leaves, or chicken bones to predict it. To accurately predict the breeding season we must first understand the why’s, where’s, what’s, and when’s of the rut. After that it’s a simple matter of math. As much fun as rolling the chicken bones might be, it probably won’t get you any closer to predicting the rut.


Even though the rut is the best time to harvest big bucks, the breeding season is truly all about the does. The rut serves one purpose: to perpetuate the species. To best understand the breeding season, we must look back through the eons of time and see the myriad natural factors that affect it.

The Evolution of the Rut

The Weather Factor

The last Ice Age occurred ten thousand years ago. Due to the severity of winter across most of North America, the deer had to adapt to a narrow fawning window of about two weeks each spring. Fawns had to be born late enough so their mothers could recover enough strength to nurse them. Yet, they needed to be born early enough to be able to gain sufficient body weight in order to survive the coming winter.

As deer evolved, Mother Nature played an important role in the timing of the deer breeding season. Survival of the species depended on a proper season of rutting.

Because of the severe energetic costs of lactation, the birth of fawns is typically correlated to the availability of highly nutritious forage.

For the first few days after birth, fawns nurse two or three times during daylight hours. Nursing becomes less frequent as the fawns begin to forage, and stops altogether after about four months.

The Predator Factor

In ancient times, predators were far more abundant than they are today. Predators limited deer populations. Fawns are exceptionally vulnerable to predators. Several years ago I came across a coyote den and found a dozen fawn hoofs in front of the opening.

Mother Nature’s response is to have as many fawns hitting the ground at the same time as possible. This further narrows the birthing window to about four days in late May or early June. An abundant food supply makes it virtually impossible for predators to wipe out the deer.

The size of the doe is another contributing factor in determining the rut’s timing. The average weight of a mature doe in the northwest and northeastern United States is about 135 pounds. In the Midwest, deer are a little bigger, averaging about 150 pounds. In the Deep South they’ll go maybe a hundred pounds. Size affects gestation periods. Midwest deer will have a gestation period of 200 to 210 days, while southern deer often give birth after only 190 days.

The average gestation period for a whitetail doe is two hundred days. All we have to do is to subtract two hundred days from the day the fawns are born and we’ll have a good idea of when the breeding occurred.

Most fawns are born in the last few days of May and the first few days of June. In my neck of the woods, the fawns are generally born between June 2 and June 4. That puts the breeding around November 15.

Most hunters are confused about when the actual breeding takes place, because the deer generally are not visible. Most of the rutting activity occurs at night. When breeding is going on, bucks and does are often paired and remain in some secluded sanctuary.

The best time to see big bucks is immediately prior to, and after, the majority of the breeding has taken place. A doe will only be in estrus for around twenty-four hours. After inseminating a doe, the buck will be on the move to find another receptive female. He usually doesn’t have to travel far. After the rut, when the bucks are looking for one last chance at "love," they are most visible and vulnerable.

“The rut is late again.” I hear this complaint at least every other year, but strangely the fawns are born at the exact same time each spring. Just as sure as the sun rises, the rut must go on.

Good Luck and Good Hunting,
Jim
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Tuesday, November 6, 2012

The Button Hook and Scrape Hunting

This blog is a sequel to my post of 8 –19–2012 entitled Button Hookin’ Bucks. (Photo courtesy of Apple Creek Whitetails)


Regardless of which strategy, technique, and the time of the year you hunt wind direction is always a hunters major concern. When it comes to hunting trophy deer it’s not how we use the wind that is important, but rather, how the buck uses the wind.

Most hunters place their stands downwind of where they expect to intercept a big buck. They do this with little regard to how the deer actually use the wind as a defense mechanism.

Big bucks approach every destination spot by traveling in a button hook or J–hook pattern. A big buck will circle down wind and use his nose to detect danger before he approaches a food plot, a bedding area, a ground scrape, or when coming to grunt calls and antler rattling. Big bucks employee this button hook pattern so regularly it must be considered an instinctual or innate behavior. Regardless of where you hunt I can guarantee you every buck over 1-1/2 years old is continuously using the button hook pattern of travel.

We discussed how a big buck uses the button hook pattern when selecting a bedding site. Today we will be discussing how the big buck uses the button hook to scent check ground scrapes.

First of all, not all ground scrapes are equal. We must first determine whether the scrape is a primary scrape or a casual scrape. Remember, primary scrapes are those that are used by several bucks.

Next, we must determine whether the buck is refreshing the primary scrape at night or during the day. Unfortunately, most scrapes noticed by hunters are the ones which are freshened at night. These scrapes are usually found close to or on the edge of a known food source. Generally speaking, if the prevailing wind in your area does not allow the buck enough cover to scent check the scrape downwind at a distance of 75 to 125 yards, it is a nocturnal scrape and of little use to the hunter.

Since the deer are most active at night, this eliminates roughly 90% of the scrapes you will find. We are looking for a scrape in heavy cover which allows the buck enough security to check it throughout the day. When you find such a scrape, be rest assured that the buck will attempt to check it some time during the day.

The problem most hunters have is they either select the wrong scrape or set their stand too close to the right scrape. A big buck will always circle downwind of the scrape before he attempts to freshen it. We want to place our stand as close to the buck’s scent checking trail as possible and NOT right on top the scrape. Usually this trail will be between 75 and 125 yards downwind of the scrape.

Often you will find a small rub or a token scrape ( one that is little more than a couple of hoof pulls in the sod} to indicate where this trail is. Note: this trail is very faint and hardly noticeable.

I like to place my stand slightly downwind of that trail making sure I have a path to approach the stand without fouling the entire area with my own scent.

All that’s left is to have patience and the faith that the buck will come.

For more detailed information on proper scrape hunting: Grab It Now

Good Luck and Good Hunting,
Jim
http://jimcollyer.com/

Sunday, November 4, 2012

How Do You Scout Deer?

One of the questions I get asked most often is “How can I harvest more big bucks without working so hard?”




Of all the skills you can learn to be more successful, scouting is by far the single most valuable skill you could ever master.

Although it seems a daunting task, scouting is one of the easiest and fastest skills to master. It’s also one of the most misunderstood skills.

When most people think scouting, they imagine countless hours of glassing and days spent scouring the woods.

In fact, if you are a hunter or thinking about becoming one, you will need to develop your scouting skills, and fast. Don’t for even a minute start thinking your hunting style is different and you will never have to do any real scouting.

Your success in hunting will depend directly on your ability to scout deer effectively.

Scouting is the life-blood from which all your hunting dreams and goals are accomplished. So how can you learn to scout better without working so hard at it?

Advanced Scouting Information

Thank you for reading. I’m fully dedicated to bringing you the best information available as we travel the road to hunting success together.

Good Luck and Good Hunting,
Jim
http://jimcollyer.com/

Thursday, November 1, 2012

Northwest Wild Country Radio this Saturday

Be sure to listen to Northwest Wild Country Radio this Saturday. Host Joel Shangle will be interviewing me on hunting late season whitetails here in the Pacific Northwest.
Catch the show LIVE this Saturday at 6:45 AM on the radio (Sportradio KJR 950 AM & 102.9 FM in Seattle), on TV (Comcast Channels 37, 40, 179 & 337 in Western WA & OR), or online at www.950kjr.com or www.nwwildcountry.com

179 AM for those in the Spokane listening area.

Northwest Wild Country is Seattle’s top rated Saturday morning radio show and I’m excited to be on the show. Coach Bobby Knight, General Chuck Yeager, Michael Waddell, and Jimmy Houston have all been past guests on the show and I’m really honored to be included in such a prestigious group.
Sounds like it will be a very exciting and informative show. Be sure to listen in this Saturday.
Good Luck & Good Hunting,
Jim
http://jimcollyer.com/


Host Joel Shangle

Wednesday, October 31, 2012

Crash and Return

I’ve been rattling whitetail deer for over 30 years. In fact, my biggest buck to date was killed responding to the horns.


Horn rattling back in the 1960's was pretty much limited to the Texas brush country. In the 1970s hunters began to experiment with horn rattling throughout much of North America. Some had good luck, most did not.

Horn rattling is most effective immediately prior to and immediately after the prime rutting period. Even though I’ve rattled and several whoppers, it’s not my favorite method of calling. Horn rattling can be a little too aggressive for the more timid big buck.

Big bucks are increasingly wary in areas where a lot of hunters are pounding antlers together. However, in areas with little hunting pressure it is still one of the most effective ways to harvest a big buck. Just remember the buck always approaches from downwind in hopes of catching the scent of the bucks he believes are fighting. It’s important to have a good shooting lane downwind from your rattling position.

I begin by crashing the antlers together. Then I twist and work the antlers together in an effort to imitate the sounds of two bucks sparring. My entire rattling sequence only lasts about 15 seconds. I try not to rattle more than once every 10 to 15 minutes because the last thing I want is a buck to catch me rattling. It’s happened more than once and every time the results have been less than desirable.

Today, I rely more on bleat calls and grunt calls. I still carry rattling horns with me, but use them more as a last ditch effort.

Many times I’ll have a big buck approaching my stand and for no good reason at the last minute he’ll turn and walk out of range. As soon as he is out of sight, I’ll crash the antlers together for a few seconds. Often, if the buck is not on a hot doe’s trail, he’ll immediately return to investigate and I’ll be waiting.

This is a tactic I called “Crash and Return”.

http://jimcollyer.com/

Good Luck and Good Hunting,
Jim



Monday, October 29, 2012

Sneak Preview

Several weeks ago I told you I would have an announcement concerning my new book, Buck Naked: The Straight Dope on Trophy Whitetails.


Here it is!

Within the next two weeks Buck Naked will come out with a second edition. We’re giving the book a complete new look. A new and exciting cover as well as new interior images.

The new cover and exterior images were provided courtesy of Apple Creek Whitetails. The good folks at Apple Creek live and breathe whitetail deer. Currently they are running one of the most prestigious and successful deer hunting ranches in Wisconsin. My deep gratitude goes to everyone at Apple Creek Whitetails for their help in making my book even better.

For the very best in Wisconsin trophy hunting contact:

Apple Creek Whitetails Ranch
Hunting Operations Manager
Attention: Chad DeBauch
14109 County Road VV
Gillett, WI 54124
Toll Free: 877-431-HUNT
(4868)

If you are fortunate enough to have a copy of the first edition, hang on to it. History has shown us first edition hunting books dramatically increase in value in just a few short years. The idea to come up with an improved cover and interior was suggested by several members of the publishing community and, of course, the hunting box stores.
Be sure to check your e-mails over the next couple of weeks as we will be announcing a launch day for the new book, Buck Naked.

There are still a few copies of the original book available through Amazon, but when they're gone, they're gone. If you want an first edition, you better order today.

Get a Copy Today
Until then,
Jim

Sunday, October 28, 2012

Rape in the Forest


                                                   Photo courtesy Apple Creek Ranch

You don’t have to have a dirty mind to be an effective trophy deer hunter during the rut, but it sure helps. I was just reading an advertisement for my favorite deer call, Primo’s "The Can." I like this call because it is absolutely deadly on big bucks during the rut. I also like the way they sell it. Their pitches go like this:


"Estrus bleats tell bucks that a doe is ready to breed…"

"All respond quickly and dramatically to the quivering doe…"

"Reproduces the estrus bleat of mating does…"

Until I read these ads, I had no idea that does were running around willy-nilly, bleating about their desperate desire to copulate. The "quivering doe?” you ask. Seriously, I’m not making this up.

I have heard a lot of does bleat during the rut; the vast majorities were yearlings experiencing their first breeding season. The poor little darlings don’t know what to expect. All they know is that the buck keeps coming for them relentlessly. They feel the urge of blood calling to blood and they’re scared to death. The doe leads the buck into thick cover in an effort to escape him, not to find a cozy place where they can be alone.

As hunters we often try to impose noble human attributes to the animals we hunt. But there is nothing noble or gentlemanly about a whitetail buck, especially during the rut.

No one asks to be raped. Rape comes uninvited, even in the deer world. The estrus bleat is truly a rape bleat. The young doe is panicked. This sound is worth imitating because when an old buck hears this sound, he’ll know that some other buck is up to no good. He will think another buck is tending a young doe and will come in and attempt to steal the doe.

A doe’s bleat is considerably louder than the buck’s grunt and can be heard for quite a distance in the forest. However, man-made grunt calls tend to carry farther than man-made bleat calls. I like to use "The Can" in conjunction with a grunt call. A sequence of two grunts followed a few seconds later by two or three bleats seem to work best for me.

As with all calling, if the buck can’t hear you he won’t respond. I recommend the "Long Can” for its increased volume. I buy several of these each year. I only wish they’d make a can the size of a five gallon bucket.

Good Luck and Good Hunting, Jim
http://jimcollyer.com/
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Thursday, October 25, 2012

Rub Lines




                                                Photo courtesy of Apple Creek Ranch

Personally, I prefer hunting over rub lines as opposed to scrape lines. First off, bucks make rubs, does don’t. Secondly, bucks rub trees for three months each fall, while ground scrapes are limited to a few of weeks during the rut. Thirdly, scrape lines almost always follow rub lines. You can take it to the bank. Most important, it is far easier to tell the potential size of a buck from a rub than from a scrape.

Hunting rubs is more effective earlier in the fall before the urgency of the rut sets in.

Rubs come in four varieties:

Rub Lines
Cluster Rubs
Sign Post Rubs
Random Rubs

Random rubs are just that, random. At best they tell us that a buck was here and we need to search harder for more meaningful signs as to where he was headed.

Rub lines are commonly found between feeding and bedding areas. I consider it a rub line when there at least a half a dozen rubs over fifty yards of trail. This tells me the buck is regularly using this trail. Pay particular attention to which side of the tree the rub is on. This will tell you what direction the buck is traveling. Is he using the trail in the morning to return to his bedding area or is he using the trail in the evening to go to feed? These are the little things that tell you which side of the trail to put the stand on and how best to approach the stand to avoid detection.

Cluster rubs are my favorite to hunt. They are multiple rubs close together, often in the same cluster of brush or saplings. A buck will often make a flurry of rubs when he first gets out of his bed and is headed to the feeding area. It will be obvious that the buck is using this area a lot. However, you need to be extra careful because you are already too close to his main bedding area. You might want to come back late in the evening, when he is already out feeding to place your stand. Regardless of whether you hunt rub lines or cluster rubs, it is important to place your stand as close as possible to—but never within—the bedding area.

Sign post rubs really get your attention and make your heart skip a beat or two. They are huge and high. The tree will be between three and six inches in diameter. Not only will there be shredded bark on the forest floor, but slivers of wood as well. These rubs tell other bucks just who the boss is in these here parts, and they are often used year after year. The biggest problem in hunting signpost rubs is that the buck will usually visit the rub after dark. The biggest bucks are usually the most strongly nocturnal. For that reason it is always best to hunt signpost rubs before the velvet comes off.
Jim
http://jimcollyer.com/

http://www.amazon.com/Buck-Naked-Straight-Trophy-Whitetails/dp/1466498234/ref=sr_1_18?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1337214685&sr=1-18